Sponsorship Opportunity with Full Spectrum Power

December 21st, 2012

FSP
Reposted with permission. This is a great opportunity!

Full Spectrum Power has always been involved with racing, since we opened our doors in 2009. In fact, I started this business while I was racing my Ducati in the Mid-Atlantic region. So, I have always taken racing very seriously. Over the last four years, we have offered contingency, been the title sponsor of a race class, provided trackside support, and worked with racers and teams at all levels, with the understanding that you take your racing seriously- as seriously as we take building our batteries.

Today, we announced opportunites for racer support. This means that we will work with racers and teams, by offering discounted products and services to licensed racers who are interested in winning.

Here is the press release that went out to all the motorcycle news websites earlier. Feel free to send an email to sponsorship@fullspectrumpower.com

Sterling, Va., December 15, 2012- Full Spectrum Power is now accepting race sponsorship and support applications for the 2013 racing season. All riders and teams that are interested in using the world’s best lightweight batteries in 2013 are encouraged to send their resume and with 2013 racing plans or portfolio via email, to sponsorship@fullspectrumpower.com

Applications will be accepted from December 15, 2012 through January 31, 2013.

Full Spectrum Power works with racers and teams in all motorsports disciplines. From club level roadracing, to FIM World Championship factory teams, we provide lightweight battery products and technical support services that are without equal.

About Full Spectrum Power

Based in Sterling, Virginia, Full Spectrum Power produces the world’s best lightweight batteries. Since 2009, Full Spectrum Power supported riders and teams have won races and championships in every major power-sports race series, from AMA Pro Roadracing, Supercross, Motocross, and Flat Track, to ECTA, MIROCK, ADRL, AHDRA, and the FIM World Championship.

 

fspbatteries

Explaining Capacity of a Lightweight Lithium Battery

December 21st, 2012

This has been reposted with permission. It goes over a lot of the truths and fallacies out there regarding lithium batteries. The author is a friend and owner of a company that produces them. The original article can be found here.

Explaining Capacity of a Lightweight Lithium Battery

Last week I posted some basic thoughts about the use of Battery Tender® chargers on lithium batteries, and gave a few examples showing why this would not be a good idea. I also pointed out that several of our competitors claim that you can use a Battery Tender® on lithium batteries, or that this type of charger isnt ever needed.

I always laugh when I see, “No Battery Tender® needed!” as a selling point. If you don’t need one of these, should we just assume that your version of a lightweight battery simply never gets drained? Have you managed to produce a battery that is actually an unending reservoir of energy? Wow- awesome!

Or not. Yeah, actually not awesome. More like lies and obfuscation to sell product. Thanks guys- you are making everyone who produces lithium batteries look bad by association.

So, back to the Battery Tender® issue. What no one ever talks about is “why” you would would need a Battery Tender®, or maintenance charger. Lets quickly go over that question again, as it needs to be repeated. A good place to start is with an understanding of battery capacity.

Basics: a battery (any battery) is an energy storage device. A battery does not produce energy, it stores energy. In fact, every battery has a specific capacity, which should be easy to understand.

Unfortunately, battery capacity is another one of those areas- like charging of lithium batteries- where other companies are being less than honest about their batteries’ capabilities, and the methods used to rate them. In the case of lithium batteries, we now have every other battery company in the US using “PBeq” or some related term, to describe the capacity of their batteries. And as with the Battery Tender® issue, either these guys simply don’t know the truth, or they are lying to their prospective customers. (We will even supply you with a “PBeq” or “lead acid equivalent” rating for our batteries if you so choose, but we don’t believe it is at all accurate.)

Truth about lightweight battery capacity

We are very clear about our batteries’ capacity. We will even explain the methods which we use to determine capacity. We helped Motorcyclist Magazine to standardize their capacity testing earlier this year in an article about lithium batteries, which you can read here.

Here is how we rate battery capacity:

A 1 amp load/draw x number of hours= capacity (where voltage stays above 12.6v). Pretty complicated, right?

See, if we use this very simple method, everyone can understand it, and replicate the test with a light bulb and some wire. No fancy algorithms; no complicated math; no extrapolation based on lead acid stated capacity; KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid.

Further, we specify a 1 amp load because this is something that you are likely to see when you have an alarm or LOJACK on your vehicle, or if you leave your headlights on by mistake.

12.6 volts also makes sense as a threshold; while we could claim a much higher rating if we allowed the battery to go down to 3 volts, it wouldn’t do much good since your motorcycle, car, ATV, plane, whatever, isn’t going to work at 3 volts…so why bother with providing that rating?

Using this very simple method for rating battery capacity- which actually makes sense to people who actually use our products- we find that our numbers work. In the Motorcyclist Magazine article mentioned earlier, we sent them a battery that was rated at 4.6 amp hour. It was delivered to them at roughly 60% state of charge. When they tested all of the batteries using our method, they found that our battery provided 3.7 amp hours, and that was right in line with all of the rest of the batteries from other companies. Since we don’t ship our batteries fully charged- to comply with shipping regulations- the 3.7 amp hour figure is pretty close.

“Right in line”- even with the ones that claimed 15, 18, 21 amp hour ratings. The Chinese battery with the Prismatic cells which claimed to be 18 amp hour, tested to be less than our claimed 4.6 amp hour. How can this possibly be the case? Well, I have feeling that they are lying, in order to sell more batteries. Either that, or their battery does not perform as advertised, and didn’t live up to its stated capacity. I included a short discussion of these phony “PBeq” or “lead acid equivalent” ratings that other companies are using to lie about their batteries capabilities in our Pulse manual. You can download and read it here.

Back to “why” you would need a maintenance charger. If you leave your battery connected to your vehicle, there is a very good chance that your vehicle will eventually drain the battery, as I mentioned in last weeks blog post. Think about what happens when you leave the dome light on in your car for a few days- even with that massive lead acid battery which might claim to be 40 amp hour, it gets drained by one little bulb, and you need someone with jumper cables to start your car. Makes a little more sense now, right?

So, you need a maintenance charger for a battery for those reasons. It is fairly simple to understand when you lay out the numbers in a way that relates to the vehicles that actually use these batteries, isn’t it? So, while not every vehicle places the same load on a battery when it is turned off, many of them do, including all of the cars and motorcycles that I own personally.

YMMV.

I should point out that there are other ways to charge a lithium battery for use in a performance vehicle, besides a maintenance charge like the one we have discussed here. Many drag racers, land speed racers, and even some road racers, have vehicles without charging systems. For those people, a rapid recharge is required, and we have a solution with our CV1 charger.

Balance charging is also something that should be done with lithium batteries occasionally, or as needed, depending on the condition of the battery.

I am working on a post where we will discuss both of these options for charging a lightweight lithium battery.

Have a good week!

Last week I posted some basic thoughts about the use of Battery Tender® chargers on lithium batteries, and gave a few examples showing why this would not be a good idea. I also pointed out that several of our competitors claim that you can use a Battery Tender® on lithium batteries, or that this type of charger isn’t ever needed.
I always laugh when I see, “No Battery Tender® needed!” as a selling point. If you don’t need one of these, should we just assume that your version of a lightweight battery simply never gets drained? Have you managed to produce a battery that is actually an unending reservoir of energy? Wow- awesome!
Or not. Yeah, actually not awesome. More like lies and obfuscation to sell product. Thanks guys- you are making everyone who produces lithium batteries look bad by association.
So, back to the Battery Tender® issue. What no one ever talks about is “why” you would would need a Battery Tender®, or maintenance charger. Lets quickly go over that question again, as it needs to be repeated. A good place to start is with an understanding of battery capacity.
Basics: a battery (any battery) is an energy storage device. A battery does not produce energy, it stores energy. In fact, every battery has a specific capacity, which should be easy to understand.
Unfortunately, battery capacity is another one of those areas- like charging of lithium batteries- where other companies are being less than honest about their batteries’ capabilities, and the methods used to rate them. In the case of lithium batteries, we now have every other battery company in the US using “PBeq” or some related term, to describe the capacity of their batteries. And as with the Battery Tender® issue, either these guys simply don’t know the truth, or they are lying to their prospective customers. (We will even supply you with a “PBeq” or “lead acid equivalent” rating for our batteries if you so choose, but we don’t believe it is at all accurate.)

Truth about lightweight battery capacity

We are very clear about our batteries’ capacity. We will even explain the methods which we use to determine capacity. We helped Motorcyclist Magazine to standardize their capacity testing earlier this year in an article about lithium batteries, which you can read here.
Here is how we rate battery capacity:
A 1 amp load/draw x number of hours= capacity (where voltage stays above 12.6v). Pretty complicated, right?
See, if we use this very simple method, everyone can understand it, and replicate the test with a light bulb and some wire. No fancy algorithms; no complicated math; no extrapolation based on lead acid stated capacity; KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid.
Further, we specify a 1 amp load because this is something that you are likely to see when you have an alarm or LOJACK on your vehicle, or if you leave your headlights on by mistake.
12.6 volts also makes sense as a threshold; while we could claim a much higher rating if we allowed the battery to go down to 3 volts, it wouldn’t do much good since your motorcycle, car, ATV, plane, whatever, isn’t going to work at 3 volts…so why bother with providing that rating?
Using this very simple method for rating battery capacity- which actually makes sense to people who actually use our products- we find that our numbers work. In the Motorcyclist Magazine article mentioned earlier, we sent them a battery that was rated at 4.6 amp hour. It was delivered to them at roughly 60% state of charge. When they tested all of the batteries using our method, they found that our battery provided 3.7 amp hours, and that was right in line with all of the rest of the batteries from other companies. Since we don’t ship our batteries fully charged- to comply with shipping regulations- the 3.7 amp hour figure is pretty close.
“Right in line”- even with the ones that claimed 15, 18, 21 amp hour ratings. The Chinese battery with the Prismatic cells which claimed to be 18 amp hour, tested to be less than our claimed 4.6 amp hour. How can this possibly be the case? Well, I have feeling that they are lying, in order to sell more batteries. Either that, or their battery does not perform as advertised, and didn’t live up to its stated capacity. I included a short discussion of these phony “PBeq” or “lead acid equivalent” ratings that other companies are using to lie about their batteries capabilities in our Pulse manual. You can download and read it here.
Back to “why” you would need a maintenance charger. If you leave your battery connected to your vehicle, there is a very good chance that your vehicle will eventually drain the battery, as I mentioned in last weeks blog post. Think about what happens when you leave the dome light on in your car for a few days- even with that massive lead acid battery which might claim to be 40 amp hour, it gets drained by one little bulb, and you need someone with jumper cables to start your car. Makes a little more sense now, right?
So, you need a maintenance charger for a battery for those reasons. It is fairly simple to understand when you lay out the numbers in a way that relates to the vehicles that actually use these batteries, isn’t it? So, while not every vehicle places the same load on a battery when it is turned off, many of them do, including all of the cars and motorcycles that I own personally.
YMMV.
I should point out that there are other ways to charge a lithium battery for use in a performance vehicle, besides a maintenance charge like the one we have discussed here. Many drag racers, land speed racers, and even some road racers, have vehicles without charging systems. For those people, a rapid recharge is required, and we have a solution with our CV1 charger.
Balance charging is also something that should be done with lithium batteries occasionally, or as needed, depending on the condition of the battery.
I am working on a post where we will discuss both of these options for charging a lightweight lithium battery.
Have a good week!

Full Spectrum Power…

April 13th, 2011

CCS @ CMP

April 13th, 2011

CCS at CMP 2011, Saturday,Middleweight GP, Turn 2

CCS at CMP 2011, Saturday,Middleweight GP, Turn 2

I know it says proof but I actually typed my info in MotoHD’s website and it posted it here automatically. I think it is a great pic and thought I would share it. Go to www.motohd.net and look at the rest of the pics from this last weekends racing. The dude took some great pics. Darcie and I had a great time. It was our first time back on the track since last year so we didn’t go as fast as we would have liked but we know which direction we need to go to go faster next round at VIR. I would like to thank Full Spectrum Power, Pitbull, Digital Decals, and my wife for helping me this weekend. She drove all night after staying up for a 19 hour shift the day before to be at the races with me. She then was the 33Pitboss and ran everything the way it is supposed to be run.

FULL SPECTRUM POWER Lightweight Batteries

January 18th, 2011

Full Spectrum Poweris owned by Jason Levitt. Here he talks with Fred from OTTabout the benefits of running a lightweight battery.

Full Spectrum Power produces the worlds smallest, lightest, and most powerful motorcycle batteries. Full Spectrum Power’s award winningPulseandGenesislightweight motorcycle batteries are hand built in the US, one at a time, using the highest quality components.Full Spectrum Powerequipped machines have won more AMA Roadracing and AMA Drag Bike races than all other lightweight motorcycle batteries combined.

Watch this space for upcoming news…

December 21st, 2010

Inevitably as it stands, I have to tear my broken bike down and repair all the damage I did after two relative high speed low-sides at VIR. I will be doing a full tear down report and build-up of it with pictures. So stay tuned!

Finals Point Standings for 2010

October 1st, 2010

The season is over. After thousands of miles travelled and thousands of dollars spent I have one thing to say. Man, what a ride! I would like to thank some people for helping me out this year:

My wife, Darcie, for being there at every round and putting up with my shit. I can get cranky at the track for whatever reason but she was always the cool head in the paddock. She was there every single time to put on my rear stand, warmers, hand me a bottle of water, help me out of my leathers, make the beds, cook the food, talk to me about how everything went on the track, taking my laptimes, telling me when I was slow, hand me a beer at the end of the day, and a buttload of other things.

Jim Cohrs, who the hell is number 54? He was there as my suspension tech even though he was in the same races as me. He was there to listen to all my suspension issues, talk to me to help me make sense of things, and just general bench racing things.

Rick Johnson, #29, one of the funniest guys in the paddock. My wife and I would lay up at night talking about some of the goofy stuff he said. He was there racing as well but always had time to give advice.

Russ Proctor, is one fast dude and was always there to help, just like Jim Cohrs. Always willing to lend a hand or an ear. Great guy.

Dan Ronca, Gian Bojanovich, Chris Cooke, and Garrett Shifflett, I owe you guys BIG time! You saved my race weekend by helping…hell, not helping, doing…putting my bike together during the last race of the season after I had landed on my ear in T17. Not a fun place to go down but you guys made it so much easier to deal with. I would have never been able to continue my weekend without you guys. Sucks that I crashed the very next day.

Danny and Gian thanks so much for helping me out all season long. I loved pitting with you guys and hearing all of your funny stories. Danny, you saved my race weekend at Summit. I should have listened to you the first time about my fuel pump going out instead of trying all kinds of other crazy things. Also dude, you pushed me and pushed me. I was tired of seeing your tail all year. You definitely made the most improvement out of everyone in the middleweight experts class.

Brett Hickman, Steve Levow, Lory Shifflet, James “JRay” Ray, Kent Marquess, Scott Tucker, Mark Miller, Drew Kessler, Jonathan “Carnage” Elias, and anyone else I forgot…you guys are the best! It was fun hanging out with everyone, racing, bench racing, wrenching, arguing, eating, drinking, or whatever!!!

Willow Downs definitely helped too…so thank you Willow Downs. (JRay knows what I am talking about)

2010 was definitely my funnest year racing and I will never forget it.

Here are my final point standing for each class I was entered in:

Southeast Region

Middleweight Superbike: 7th

Middleweight Grand Prix: 9th

GTU: 5th

Middleweight Supersport: 6th

Heavyweight Superbike: 23rd (only entered in one race the entire year!)

Heavyweight Supersport: 11th

Mid-Atlantic

Middleweight Superbike: 8th

Middleweight Grand Prix: 5th

GTU: 10th

Middleweight Supersport: 11th

See you next year!!!

GSXR Clutch ByPass

April 18th, 2010

I got this off the WERA BBS from user m0rtal1ty. It will help you when you try and bypass the clutch switch and instead your bike goes into limp mode. Here are the detailed instructions with pictures. 

Writeup: GSXR 600 clutch switch bypass relay mod w/ pics


I finished up the clutch switch bypass mod on a K6 GSXR with great success. This mod is an alternative to putting a switch on or bridging the clutch wires for starting the bike and also avoiding the limp map the ECU uses under a continuously disengaged clutch scenario. This mod is very easy to follow with some basic understanding of electronics. At any rate I’ll try to make this tutorial fairly clear and comprehensive and I apologize in advance for the length.I originally did this mod out of necessity; I sold my turn signal control pod on my new-to-me 06 GSXR 600 thinking it wasn’t necessary for starting the bike. It was. None of the other bikes I’ve ever had needed the clutch disengaged for starting in neutral… but whatever. Here’s whats involved:- 12v automotive relay, RadioShack part #275-001 or similar
– A few female quick disconnect terminals.
– Soldering iron or some splice connectors.
– Electrical tape and some wire.
– K6 GSXR or bike with similar problem.

As said earlier I’ve done this on an ’06 GSXR but I imagine other bikes are similar if not identical.

Start by removing the turn signal control pod and selling it on eBay. Was already ahead of myself there. You could get about $40 for it but hurry up before everyone else does this mod and floods eBay with used K6 gixxer control pods. As there’s no need for it on a race-only bike you can use that space for something like a switch, camera mount, or a GPS if you get lost during your race. Anyways.. The rest of the work we’re going to do is under the seat.

Next, unplug both of the main battery cables and remove the starter relay and wiring from its mount. Go ahead and unplug the black wiring connector from the relay and make a cut down its wiring sheath to expose the 4 wires; two red wires for power, a yellow/green one from the start switch, and a black/yellow wire from the clutch switch. Both of these yellow wires also plug into the ECU so it knows whats going on with each of these.

What we’re going to do next is trick the ECU into thinking the clutch is disengaged every time you push the start button. *Caution: This will also make the bike start when its in gear. That could make a very embarrassing or very hilarious situation in the paddock depending on which side of the bike you’re on. Mmmkay?

We need to tap into the Y/G and B/Y wires since we’ll be plugging those into our RadioShack relay. You can use a number of types of splicing connectors but considering the space and that we want this to work 100% of the time I decided to solder the wires on. Cut some of the jacket off of both the Y/G and B/Y wires to expose the copper wire, but don’t cut the wire. Just like in the movie Speed with Sandra Bullock and Neo. Then solder your two pieces of wire on (white wire in my case) and wrap it tight in electrical tape then crimp your disconnects on. I drew a black line on one indicating it was the clutch wire. We haven’t got to this part yet but the black wires with blue disconnects is the ground wire I put together.

We’ll continue with the B/Y clutch wire next. We want to plug this into our RadioShack relay. Since this is the wire we want to be grounded when the starter is pushed we’ll plug it into the 87 terminal on the relay. The other end of this circuit, 30, will be grounded to the battery all the time. If you have a double throw relay you can ignore the additional terminal 87a.

The remaining Y/G wire will be plugged into the 85 terminal and the other end, 86, grounded to the battery as well but it should also work in reverse although it didn’t with mine for some reason. What will happen is when the starter button is pushed and +12V runs through the Y/G starter wire it will activate the relay and bridge the B/Y clutch wire to ground and then release it when the push starter button is depressed and the starter wire deactivates. If you’re in doubt on which wire is the starter switch-connected wire you can start to poke around with a multimeter. With the ignition ‘on’ but the engine switch set to ‘off’ look for a wire that has about +3v standby which then outputs +12v when the starter button is depressed.

Make sure both ground terminals are grounded to the batteries’ negative terminal. Below is a cable I made with a ring terminal on the battery end and two female quick disconnects on the relay end. I soldered the additional wire in place for a rugged ‘Y’ connection to both grounds on the relay. You can do this a variety of different ways though.

Try to start the bike and see if it works. After it does go ahead and stash your relay in the subframe out of the way. I zip tied mine to a wiring harness in the tail for some shock absorption so it will continue to work after I inevitably crash on the track I did all this work for.

Now put the new clipon space to use. I put a start/run switch from a CBR on mine to power a data acquisition setup and I also have a free momentary switch for something else.. like a horn that plays dixie. Or not.

This setup either works or it doesn’t; check your wiring if it doesn’t start or if the relay makes a buzzing noise. In other words… if the bike starts up and promptly proceeds to run away into the nearest tree, parked car, pack of school children or gaggle of church nuns then you’ve done something wrong. If you’re reading this now and its actually worked then be sure to report in with any comments or petitions for addendums or any funny stories about the bike running away into arbitrary things the first time you started it and forgot it was in gear.


m0rtal1ty

CCS 2010 Mid-Atlantic Schedule

January 25th, 2010

Mid-Atlantic Roadracing Championship
Feb 26-27-28 Daytona Intl Speedway
Apr 10 Carolina MP
Apr 11 Carolina MP
May 1-2 New Jersey MP
May 29-30-31 Summit Point Circuit
June 19-20 Virginia Intl
July 3-4 Summit Point Circuit
July 24-25 New Jersey MP
Aug 27-28-29 Summit Point Circuit
Sep 25-26 Virginia Intl

Hopefully I will be able to attend more than the two events I did last year.

VIR End of Summer Cyclefest 2009

September 26th, 2009

I made it to my second race weekend of the year. It was pretty uneventful but I did manage to get some pictures snapped of me and some friends. Now to get ready for next year. I can’t wait! During this event my wife got to get a two up ride with Steve Broadstreet. Pretty sweet if you ask me. Be sure to check out my Useful Files For Racers page. Also for all the stuff you need for your bike at a great price visit Sportbiketrackgear.com